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A Warning Shot: The Collapse of SVB and Its Implications for the Banking System

Updated: Mar 1



Silicon Valley Bank (SVB) was once the premier financial institution for US tech startups, boasting financing for nearly half of all US venture-backed technology and health care companies. However, just one week ago, on March 10, 2023, SVB suffered a sudden collapse and was taken over by federal regulators, marking the largest failure of a US bank since Washington Mutual in 2008. This alarming turn of events prompts a critical examination of the factors that led to SVB's downfall and the potential implications for the US and global banking systems.


The Downfall of SVB: A Closer Look at the Contributing Factors

SVB's collapse can be traced back to disruptions caused by rising interest rates. The Federal Reserve began increasing interest rates a year ago in an effort to curb inflation, which subsequently diminished the value of long-term bonds that SVB and other banks had purchased during the period of ultra-low interest rates. SVB's $21 billion bond portfolio was yielding an average of 1.79%, while the current 10-year Treasury yield is approximately 3.9%. This disparity meant that SVB was losing money on its bond investments on a daily basis.


The escalating interest rates also drained the momentum of tech stocks that had previously benefited SVB


The escalating interest rates also drained the momentum of tech stocks that had previously benefited SVB. As startup clients withdrew deposits to sustain their companies in an increasingly unfavorable environment for IPOs and private fundraising, SVB found itself short on capital. Compounding this issue, SVB faced a rise in loan losses as some of its borrowers defaulted or struggled to repay their debts.


The final straw came in the form of rumors suggesting that SVB was grappling with liquidity problems and regulatory scrutiny. This set off a classic run on the bank, with depositors scrambling to withdraw their funds from SVB accounts. In just two days, SVB lost more than $40 billion in deposits, rendering it insolvent and unable to fulfill its obligations.


On March 10, 2023, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) seized SVB and sold its assets and liabilities to Bank of America for $2 billion. The FDIC also announced that it would cover up to $250,000 per depositor as part of its insurance program.




Implications for the Banking System: Emerging Concerns and Questions

The collapse of SVB has generated shockwaves throughout the financial industry and raised concerns about the stability and resilience of the banking system.


One such concern revolves around whether other banks could encounter similar issues as interest rates rise and tech valuations decline. Some analysts have identified Signature Bank, another lender with exposure to tech startups and cryptocurrencies, as potentially vulnerable to a run on deposits or regulatory action. Signature Bank was also taken over by the FDIC on March 12 after losing more than $20 billion in deposits.


some critics argue that the Fed should have acted sooner or more aggressively to prevent or mitigate the collapse of SVB or other banks


Another worry is whether increased interest rates could instigate a broader sell-off in bond markets or create credit crunches for borrowers reliant on affordable financing. Some economists have cautioned that rising interest rates could pose risks for emerging markets or heavily indebted corporations or households.


A third concern pertains to the adequacy and appropriateness of the Fed's response to the crisis. The Fed has provided funds to other banks through its discount window and overnight lending facilities to prevent liquidity shortages or contagion effects from spreading throughout the financial system. Nevertheless, some critics argue that the Fed should have acted sooner or more aggressively to prevent or mitigate the collapse of SVB or other banks.


Janet Yellen, Secretary of the US Treasury

Moreover, the Fed has faced scrutiny over its supervision and regulation of SVB and other banks with exposure to tech startups or cryptocurrencies. Some lawmakers have accused the Fed of neglecting to identify or respond to warning signs that these banks were taking excessive risks or engaging in questionable practices.


Understanding the Impact and Moving Forward

The dramatic collapse of SVB has exposed vulnerabilities in both individual banks' business models and systemic issues related to interest rate movements, tech sector dynamics, and regulatory oversight. While it is too early to fully assess the consequences of this event on the banking system, it is evident that it has rattled confidence and heightened awareness of potential challenges and opportunities for both bankers and regulators.


Close cooperation between central banks and financial institutions will be crucial in navigating the challenges posed by a shifting interest rate environment and ensuring the stability of the global banking system


The SVB collapse serves as a stark reminder of the importance of prudent risk management, regulatory vigilance, and a proactive approach to addressing potential threats within the banking industry. Financial institutions, regulators, and policymakers must work together to analyze the contributing factors of SVB's collapse and implement measures to prevent similar incidents in the future.


In the wake of the SVB crisis, banks may need to reassess their risk exposure to certain sectors, particularly those that have benefited from the era of low-interest rates, such as the tech industry. Additionally, regulators must closely monitor banks with high exposure to potentially volatile sectors and enforce appropriate risk management policies to safeguard the stability of the financial system.


Furthermore, the Federal Reserve and other central banks must strike a delicate balance between addressing inflation concerns and preventing financial instability caused by rapidly rising interest rates. Close cooperation between central banks and financial institutions will be crucial in navigating the challenges posed by a shifting interest rate environment and ensuring the stability of the global banking system.


In conclusion, the collapse of SVB is a sobering event that has highlighted the need for vigilance, collaboration, and adaptability in the banking sector. As we move forward, it is crucial that all stakeholders in the financial industry learn from this experience, adapt to the evolving landscape, and work together to foster a more robust and resilient banking system that can withstand future challenges and uncertainties.

--John Gibbs, Co-Founder and CEO, Artimatic
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